Menopause Articles A-Z

Menopause Relief - Perimenopause

This page contains links to eMedTV Menopause Articles containing information on subjects from Menopause Relief to Perimenopause. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Menopause Relief
    Symptoms of menopause can often be relieved through exercise, getting enough rest, and medication. This eMedTV article offers suggestions for relief of menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and also offers a tracking chart.
  • Menopause Symptoms
    Aside from changes in a woman's period, menopause symptoms may include hot flashes and vaginal dryness. This eMedTV article discusses these and other possible signs or symptoms of menopause, such as mood changes, urinary problems, and night sweats.
  • Menopause Treatment
    There are many ways of treating menopause symptoms, such as getting enough exercise and taking hormones. This eMedTV article discusses other treatment options and contains links to additional information.
  • Menopauze
    During menopause, your period stops and your body makes less female hormones. This eMedTV resource further explains what happens during menopause and lists symptoms that may occur. Menopauze is a common misspelling of menopause.
  • Menopose
    Women approaching menopause may experience changes in their period and hot flashes. This eMedTV Web page further defines "menopause" and explains how long symptoms typically last. Menopose is a common misspelling of menopause.
  • Menopouse
    Menopause is a normal part of life in which you stop having your period. This page from the eMedTV archives describes some of the symptoms that you may experience as you approach menopause. Menopouse is a common misspelling of menopause.
  • Menopuase
    A woman has reached menopause when she has had an absence of periods for at least 12 months. This eMedTV article describes some of the other changes that may occur with the body during this time. Menopuase is a common misspelling of menopause.
  • Menopuse
    Menopause is the time in which your body makes natural changes and you stop having your period. This eMedTV resource explains when menopause may happen and what symptoms may occur leading up to it. Menopuse is a common misspelling of menopause.
  • Menostar
    Menostar is a prescription estrogen medication used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV segment describes how Menostar works, explains how to use the skin patch, and lists warnings to be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Menostar and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended that breastfeeding women avoid using Menostar patches. This page from the eMedTV archives offers more information on Menostar and breastfeeding, and explains what problems may occur if a breastfeeding woman uses this drug.
  • Menostar and Pregnancy
    There are no approved Menostar uses for pregnant women. This section of the eMedTV Web site provides a more in-depth look at Menostar and pregnancy, including information on why the drug is not recommended for pregnant women.
  • Menostar Dosage
    For osteoporosis prevention, the standard Menostar dosage is one 14-mcg patch applied once a week. This eMedTV resource provides more Menostar dosing information and includes tips for how and where to apply the patch to the skin.
  • Menostar Drug Interactions
    If medicines such as cyclosporine or barbiturates are taken with Menostar, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV Web page lists other medications that may interact with Menostar and describes the potential effects of these drug interactions.
  • Menostar Overdose
    A Menostar overdose is unlikely to cause serious problems, even in young children. This eMedTV resource describes the symptoms that may occur as a result of an overdose of Menostar and explains what steps would be taken to treat the overdose.
  • Menostar Patch Information
    This part of the eMedTV site contains information on the Menostar patch, which is used to prevent bone loss. Side effects, warnings, and dosing are discussed in this article. A link to more information is also included.
  • Menostar Side Effects
    Common Menostar side effects include dizziness, constipation, and muscle pain. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV article also lists rare but serious side effects that require immediate medical attention, such as dementia or strokes.
  • Menostar Uses
    Menostar is used for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This part of the eMedTV library explains how the drug works to prevent menopause-related bone changes and discusses possible off-label Menostar uses.
  • Menostar Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use Menostar if you have liver disease. This eMedTV segment offers more information on who should not use Menostar. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with the estrogen medication are also listed in this article.
  • Menpause
    Menopause is the time when a woman menstruates less frequently and then stops having her period altogether. This eMedTV resource describes some of the other changes that occur during this time. Menpause is a common misspelling of menopause.
  • Mimvey
    Available only by prescription, Mimvey is used to treat various symptoms that occur with menopause. This eMedTV Web page explores this medication in more detail, including how it works, potential side effects, and possible safety concerns to be aware of.
  • Mimvey Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that when treating menopause symptoms or preventing osteoporosis with Mimvey, there is only one standard dose. This page discusses dosing guidelines for this medicine, including some tips for when and how to take it.
  • Mimvey Drug Information
    Mimvey is a prescription medicine used to treat menopause symptoms and prevent osteoporosis. This page from the eMedTV site offers more information on Mimvey, explaining the drug's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Minivelle
    Minivelle comes as a skin patch prescribed for the treatment of certain menopausal symptoms. This eMedTV Web page describes this hormone replacement product in more detail, including how it works, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Minivelle Alternatives
    As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, there are a number of alternatives to Minivelle available, including other medications, natural remedies, and coping strategies. This resource looks at when it may be time to consider one of these options.
  • Minivelle and Breastfeeding
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains why it is typically not recommended for women to use Minivelle while breastfeeding. This product does pass through breast milk in small amounts and can affect the quality and production of the milk.
  • Minivelle and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment explores why Minivelle is not approved for use during pregnancy. This article discusses why Minivelle is a pregnancy Category X drug and why there is no legitimate medical reason for pregnant women to use this patch.
  • Minivelle Dosage
    The usual dosage of Minivelle is one patch applied to an area of skin twice weekly. This eMedTV Web selection provides other dosing guidelines, including tips on when and how to most effectively use this hormone replacement medication.
  • Minivelle Drug Interactions
    Some antibiotics, seizure medicines, and thyroid replacement drugs may interact with Minivelle. This eMedTV Web page lists other medications that can interfere with Minivelle and describes the effects these combinations can cause.
  • Minivelle Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web page discusses Minivelle, a skin patch that is applied twice a week to relieve various menopause symptoms. This article explores important details to discuss with your healthcare provider and lists possible side effects.
  • Minivelle Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, an overdose of Minivelle may cause vomiting, nausea, and vaginal bleeding. This article offers a description of what to do in case of an overdose and describes possible treatment options.
  • Minivelle Side Effects
    Minivelle may cause a number of side effects, such as sinus infections, headaches, and back pain. As this eMedTV article explains, while most reactions are mild, some may require urgent medical treatment, such as speech changes or chest pain.
  • Minivelle Uses
    Minivelle is prescribed for treating hot flashes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms. This eMedTV page discusses Minivelle uses in more detail, including whether this patch can be given to women without a uterus and if there are off-label uses.
  • Minivelle Warnings and Precautions
    People with certain liver problems or a blood clotting disorder may not be able to use Minivelle. This eMedTV article offers other important Minivelle warnings and precautions, including information on what to tell your doctor before using the patch.
  • Natural Menopause Relief
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, acupuncture and herbal supplements (such as red clover) are some of the things women try when seeking natural relief of menopause symptoms. This article also looks at the use of dietary soy for menopause relief.
  • Ogen
    Ogen is a prescription medication most commonly used for treating menopause symptoms. This eMedTV resource covers other uses of the drug and offers a more in-depth look at its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Ogen Alternatives
    Common Ogen (estropipate) alternatives include natural remedies, coping strategies, and other drugs. This eMedTV page explores these Ogen alternatives in more detail and includes a list of other hormone replacement medications that are available.
  • Ogen and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women are typically advised to avoid taking Ogen (estropipate). This eMedTV Web page includes more information on Ogen and breastfeeding, and discusses some of the potential dangers of using the drug while nursing.
  • Ogen and Pregnancy
    There is currently no accepted medical reason for pregnant women to use Ogen (estropipate). This eMedTV article offers more information on Ogen and pregnancy, and further explains why this drug should not be used by pregnant women.
  • Ogen Dosage
    For preventing osteoporosis, it is recommended to take your Ogen dosage cyclically (25 days on, 6 days off). This eMedTV segment provides Ogen dosing guidelines for osteoporosis prevention, menopause symptoms treatment, and estrogen replacement.
  • Ogen Drug Interactions
    If you take cyclosporine, barbiturates, or certain antifungals with Ogen, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV resource lists other medicines that may interact with Ogen and describes the potentially negative interactions that may occur.
  • Ogen HRT Information
    Ogen is used to treat menopause symptoms, prevent osteoporosis, and more. This eMedTV resource offers a brief description of Ogen, including information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
  • Ogen Overdose
    An Ogen (estropipate) overdose may cause nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding. This segment from the eMedTV Web site further describes the effects of an Ogen overdose and explains the treatment options that are available.
  • Ogen Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Ogen include hair loss, fluid retention, and nausea. As this page from the eMedTV site explains, while most Ogen side effects are minor, some require immediate medical attention, such as blood clots, strokes, or dementia.
  • Ogen Uses
    Ogen is primarily used for treating menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes or vaginal dryness. This eMedTV Web page also lists other approved Ogen uses, explains how the drug works for these conditions, and discusses possible off-label uses.
  • Ogen Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Ogen, let your doctor know if you have endometriosis, asthma, or migraines. This eMedTV article lists other conditions your doctor must know about before you take Ogen. Warnings and precautions on who should avoid Ogen are also included.
  • Osfena
    Osphena is a prescription drug licensed to treat painful sexual intercourse in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV article explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone and covers how to take it. Osfena is a common misspelling of Osphena.
  • Osphena
    Osphena is prescribed to treat painful sexual intercourse in women who have gone through menopause. This eMedTV Web page provides more details on this medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Osphena and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown whether Osphena (ospemifene) passes through breast milk or if it would harm a nursing infant. This eMedTV page explains, however, that this drug is not designed for use in breastfeeding women, as it is approved for postmenopausal women.
  • Osphena and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page contains a discussion on the safety issues surrounding the use of Osphena (ospemifene) during pregnancy. It takes a look at the complications that occurred during animal studies and explains what your doctor may advise.
  • Osphena Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Osphena tablets are taken once a day to treat painful intercourse caused by menopause. More Osphena dosing tips are outlined in this article, including helpful suggestions for when and how to take this medicine.
  • Osphena Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV segment explains, interactions may occur if you combine Osphena with certain drugs. This article examines how Valium, medicines that affect liver enzymes, and a number of other products may lead to problems when used with Osphena.
  • Osphena Medication Information
    By treating vaginal dryness, Osphena can relieve painful sexual intercourse in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV Web selection contains information on Osphena, including how this medication works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Osphena Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, an overdose on Osphena (ospemifene) may cause muscle spasms, sweating, or other complications. This page describes other possible effects of an overdose and lists some of the ways these problems may be treated.
  • Osphena Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, possible Osphena side effects include muscle spasms, excessive sweating, and hot flushes. This article also describes potentially serious problems that can occur with this drug and explains when treatment is necessary.
  • Osphena Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Osphena is used to relieve vaginal dryness and other problems that may lead to painful sexual intercourse in postmenopausal women. This resource discusses other uses for this drug, including unapproved purposes.
  • Osphena Warnings and Precautions
    Do not take Osphena if you have had a stroke or heart attack. This page from the eMedTV Web library presents a list of safety precautions to be aware of with Osphena, including warnings for women who have an increased risk for complications.
  • Parmarin
    Premarin is a drug used to treat menopausal symptoms and to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV page lists other Premarin uses and explains how and when to take the medicine. Parmarin is a common misspelling of Premarin.
  • Peri-Menopause
    Perimenopause is the period of time leading up to menopause. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains when perimenopause may occur and describes what happens during this time period. Peri-menopause is a common misspelling of perimenopause.
  • Perimenapause
    Perimenopause is the term used to describe the period of time leading up to menopause. This eMedTV segment lists symptoms of perimenopause and explores how long this period may last. Perimenapause is a common misspelling of perimenopause.
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